Become a Befriender

“I enjoy being a befriender and helping out in the community, especially with someone with disabilities. I get a lot of satisfaction from this.”

—Suzanne, Befriender with Lead Scotland

Befriending organisations are always on the lookout for new volunteers!

What makes a good volunteer befriender? 

  • Someone who is interested in other people
  • Someone who is a good listener
  • Someone one who is reliable
  • Someone who could commit to volunteering 2-3 hours each week 

If this sounds like you, here's a few things to consider:

Find an organisation that is local to you and matches your area of interest by visiting our directory of Befriending Networks members. Organisations will provide training to prepare you for the role of befriender, so, often, previous experience is not needed; it's more about who you are than your previous experience. Bear in mind, however, that because befriending involves supporting someone who is isolated, organisations assess volunteers carefully and will take time to review your application/offer of volunteering. Once you've been matched with your befriendee, your organisation will offer regular support, supervision and ongoing training to continue to help you in your befriending role.

Befriending is a chance to give, by offering your time and commitment, but every befriender also has stories of what they get back in return.

Here's what one Befriender thinks about his experience

“I have improved my confidence, especially by trying things I haven’t done before… It’s been really good trying new things and pushing the envelope a bit in terms of what I thought I’d be comfortable with.”

—Jonathan, Befriender with People Know How

 

 

 

 

Become a Befriender

Check out the directory for details of organisations with befriending projects near you.

Alternatively your Volunteer Centre can tell you about befriending opportunities in your area: Volunteer Scotland or Volunteering England.

Directory